The Graveyard Book

What I love about Neil Gaiman is that the books of his I have read, Coraline and The Graveyard Book, seem to be books for children or young adults but actually have much darker and more complex elements than most books for young people. You may know what I’m talking about if you have seen the movie version of Coraline.  Not exactly kid’s stuff.

Same with The Graveyard Book. A boy’s family is murdered when he is just a baby but the boy manages to escape and crawls away to a graveyard.  He is received by ghosts who name him Nobody or “Bod” for short.  The ghosts decide they will raise him and keep him in the graveyard, safe from the man Jack who killed his family.  Two ghosts, Mr. and Mrs. Owens become his parents while a man called Silas becomes his guardian.  Bod is given the “Freedom of the Graveyard” and learns such skills as Fading, Dreamwalking, and Sliding.  He also learns about different varieties of the dead, such as Hounds of God, ghouls, and night gaunts.  However, he can’t stay in the graveyard forever and eventually must leave his beloved ghosts and join the world of the living.  This book was a lovely read, both enchanting and exciting. Read the rest of this entry »

The Adventuress

Ok, so I’ve read this graphic novel probably more than ten times but I re-read it to my friend who was in town in January and it’s one of my favorite books by one of my favorite authors so thought I would include it on this blog.

This graphic novel is strange and wonderful and the only tattoo I have is actually from this book; a picture of two women embracing who are topless but wearing long black skirts and long opera gloves.  The tattoo represents self love, my astrological sign, Gemini, and also represents being an LGBTQ person.

This book reads like a dream and is the story of an alchemist’s daughter and her strange adventures which include fleeing from her husband, wrapping herself in a cocoon and becoming a moth, giving birth to a cat and transcending the tragedy she has left behind.  The prose is sparse but inventive and much of the story is told through aquatint etchings, an elaborate process that is becoming outdated and is explained at the back of this book.  The words and the etchings give the book a unique, antique feel.