2011: My Year in Reading!

Friends, here is my 2011 year in reading! (Not counting all of the children’s books I read when I was a nanny,  various zines, magazines, newspapers, online articles, and blogs I read.)  I wanted to write a blog for every book I read in 2011 but that didn’t exactly happen. Out of the 31 (almost 32!) books I read this year, I only wrote blogs for 13 or 14 of them…  Better luck next year I suppose.  I had hoped to read more like 36 to 40 books in 2011, but that’s okay. In 2012,  I am setting my goal at reading 35 books, with the knowledge that I will be in school and will not have as much time to read for pleasure.  Also in 2012, I would like to broaden my reading spectrum and include more non-fiction books and more classics, as the majority of what I read this past year was either young adult or contemporary fiction. So friends, here is my year in books broken up by category. In color is my favorite book I read in 2011 from that genre, followed by a brief synopsis. Oh, and I also tried to include the month I read the book, (although the months may not be entirely accurate…)  Oh, and I made a section for all the LGBT books I read this year even though the books are listed by other genres as well.  Enjoy! And feel free to ask me questions about any of these!

Young Adult Fiction

Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan (July)

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman (February)

Forever and Are You There God, It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume (February)

Crank by Ellen Hopkins (March)

Catching Fire, Hunger Games, Mockingjay (series) by Suzanne Collins (April and May)

Amazing! Highly rated by many “best of” 2011 book lists and not without cause.  Many people that I spoke to about these books had to run right out and get the next book after finishing the first one.  These books are set in a dystopian society in the future where kids are picked from each family to fight against each other to the death in a giant arena filled with traps. It’s the government’s fucked up way of keeping control of the people.  We follow the heroine, Katniss, as she is chosen to be one of those who fights in the arena and how she comes to win “the games” as they are called.  Thrilling and a must read if you are into young adult fiction or dystopian fiction. Disclaimer: The third book isn’t quite as good as the first two.

Uglies/Pretties trilogy (series) by Scott Westerfeld (April-July)

Matched by Allie Condie (December)

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian by Sherman Alexie (August)

Empress of The World (March)

Read the rest of this entry »

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Kiss & Tell: A Romantic Resume, Ages 0-22 by Mari Naomi

I first heard about Mari Naomi through Sister Spit, a group of  feminist and queer writers lead by Michelle Tea who travel and read their work.  I love graphic novels so I was excited that Sister Spit had chosen to feature Mari Naomi, a bay area comic book artist.  Kiss and Tell is Mari Naomi’s first graphic novel and is also one of the most interesting graphic novels I’ve read in a while.  I would highly recommend it to any who are fans of Michelle Tea. 

The books content is pretty much described in the title and is a catalogue of all Mari’s romantic and sexual encounters between ages 5 and  22.  She includes stories of silly childhood infatuation along the lines of “if you show me yours I’ll show you mine.”  However, the book later becomes more serious as she illustrates the thrill, heartache, and experimentation of her later relationships.  While the events in the book may be shocking to some, she exposes her encounters  in a very honest and matter of fact fashion.  This is something I appreciated, because it just notes her encounters for what they are, without judgment. The book contains a very intimate portrayal of Mari’s experiences which include losing her virginity, having an abortion, her first love being sent to jail, and also follows her experimentation with women and with open relationships.

Although many will not have quite the experience that Mari had as a teenager, I think the book is easily relatable because of  its themes of first love, first lust, and first major heartache.  Its descriptions of what it is like to be young are also right on point with the recklessness, thrill and naivety of being young and feeling bulletproof.

Raised by traditional Japanese American parents, Mari rebels and as a teen even runs away from home.  She quits high school and moves in with her boyfriend until he is sent to jail.  She experiments with drugs and drinks and questions her identity.  One thing I appreciated about the book is her feminist stance on her sexuality.  She doesn’t seem to regret or feel guilt about her many sexual encounters and sex is a topic in the book that Mari is empowered by and chooses.  Some of her experiences are merely hook ups or make outs but the two main stories in the graphic novel tackle her experiences with falling in love.

The only thing that left me dissatisfied about this graphic novel was its ending.  She breaks up with her long-term, live in relationship and moves away.  At the end is a drawing of her with descriptions of what she has become, including married and monogamous.  I would be interested to see what she learned and what happened between where the graphic novel leaves off and her life at present.  Luckily though, I believe she is working on a second book that may shed some insight.


 

The Adventuress

Ok, so I’ve read this graphic novel probably more than ten times but I re-read it to my friend who was in town in January and it’s one of my favorite books by one of my favorite authors so thought I would include it on this blog.

This graphic novel is strange and wonderful and the only tattoo I have is actually from this book; a picture of two women embracing who are topless but wearing long black skirts and long opera gloves.  The tattoo represents self love, my astrological sign, Gemini, and also represents being an LGBTQ person.

This book reads like a dream and is the story of an alchemist’s daughter and her strange adventures which include fleeing from her husband, wrapping herself in a cocoon and becoming a moth, giving birth to a cat and transcending the tragedy she has left behind.  The prose is sparse but inventive and much of the story is told through aquatint etchings, an elaborate process that is becoming outdated and is explained at the back of this book.  The words and the etchings give the book a unique, antique feel.